News | Technology
23 Jul 2017 8:54
NZCity News
NZCity CalculatorReturn to NZCity

  • Start Page
  • Personalise
  • Sport
  • Weather
  • Olympic Games
  • Ski Report
  • Finance
  • Shopping
  • Jobs
  • Horoscopes
  • Lotto Results
  • Photo Gallery
  • Site Gallery
  • TVNow
  • Dating
  • SearchNZ
  • NZSearch
  • Crime.co.nz
  • RugbyLeague
  • Make Home
  • About NZCity
  • Contact NZCity
  • Your Privacy
  • Advertising
  • Login
  • Join for Free

  •   Home > News > Technology

    NASA's balloon launches from Wanaka

    NASA has successfully launched its massive test balloon from Wanaka on the eighth attempt, with a poppy to commemorate Anzac Day as part of the payload.


    A poppy is flying on the payload of NASA's super-pressure balloon, which has launched from Wanaka Airport on its eighth attempt.

    The balloon, which will inflate to the size of a football stadium, left the ground at 10.50am on Anzac Day.

    The previous attempts, the last of which was on Saturday, were called off because of unfavourable winds.

    The balloon is designed to run for 100 or more days, floating more than 33km above the Southern Hemisphere's mid-latitude band.

    NASA balloon programme office chief Debbie Fairbrother says validating the super pressure balloon technology is the flight's main objective.

    She says key lessons have been learnt from the 2015 and 2016 flights that launched from Wanaka.

    It is also a mission of opportunity for the International Extreme Universe Space Observatory on a Super Pressure Balloon (EUSO-SPB) payload.

    EUSO-SPB's objective from a high-altitude vantage point is to detect ultra-high energy cosmic rays from beyond the galaxy as they penetrate the Earth's atmosphere.

    As the high-energy particles enter the atmosphere, they interact with nitrogen molecules in the air and create a UV fluorescence light.

    The project's principal investigator, Chicago University professor Angela Olinto, says EUSO-SPB is searching for the most energetic cosmic particles ever observed.

    "The origin of these particles is a great mystery that our pioneering mission will help to solve," she said.

    "Do they come from massive black holes at the centre of galaxies? Tiny, fast-spinning pulsars? Or somewhere else?"

    The balloon's progress can be tracked from the website: https://www.csbf.nasa.gov/newzealand/wanaka.htm

    © 2017 NZN, NZCity


     Other Technology News
     21 Jul: Telcos may be left out by Facebook, Google
     21 Jul: Drunken thief robs Auckland bank: police
     20 Jul: Kiwi's not miserable: Study
     18 Jul: China bans Winnie the Pooh over internet jokes comparing him to President Xi Jinping
     12 Jul: Donald Trump Jr emails: Read the full text
     10 Jul: Ministers hail new 111 call technology
     07 Jul: Science key in 'fake news' fight: advisor
     Top Stories

    RUGBY RUGBY
    Chiefs beat Stormers to book spot in semis More...


    BUSINESS BUSINESS
    NRL see dawn of new era for Knights owners More...



     Today's News

    Entertainment:
    Papua New Guinea election: Highlands-style democracy sees foreigners offered chance to vote 8:47

    Accident and Emergency:
    Trampers rescued from Tongariro Crossing 8:47

    Environment:
    SI storm over but headaches remain 8:27

    International:
    Myanmar's textile workers pay the price for Australia's fast fashion addiction 8:27

    Tennis:
    Kiwis fifth in return to Fed Cup 8:07

    Soccer:
    NZ goalkeeper Marinovic joins Vancouver 7:57

    Rugby League:
    Cowboys down Warriors, maintain NRL surge 7:37

    Hockey:
    Black Sticks beaten by Ireland in key Test 7:27

    Rugby League:
    Martin makes the most of JT apprenticeship 7:17

    Cycling:
    Bauer impresses on Tour time trial stage 7:07


     News Search






    Power Search


    © 2017 New Zealand City Ltd