News | Technology
22 Aug 2017 13:25
NZCity News
NZCity CalculatorReturn to NZCity

  • Start Page
  • Personalise
  • Sport
  • Weather
  • Olympic Games
  • Ski Report
  • Finance
  • Shopping
  • Jobs
  • Horoscopes
  • Lotto Results
  • Photo Gallery
  • Site Gallery
  • TVNow
  • Dating
  • SearchNZ
  • NZSearch
  • Crime.co.nz
  • RugbyLeague
  • Make Home
  • About NZCity
  • Contact NZCity
  • Your Privacy
  • Advertising
  • Login
  • Join for Free

  •   Home > News > Technology

    Species resurrection a mammoth question

    An Otago University biologist says efforts to bring back vanished species should focus on those recently extinct, rather than the likes of the woolly mammoth.


    Forget the ancient woolly mammoth, efforts to resurrect vanished species should target those that are recently extinct, a New Zealand conservation biologist says.

    Professor Philip Seddon, from Otago University's Department of Zoology, also says there should be determined efforts to prevent endangered species from dying out in the first place.

    He says the prospect of bringing species back through cutting-edge technology like gene-editing has caught the imagination of scientists and the public alike.

    He agrees that idea of resurrecting mammoths might have a "wow factor".

    But in an editorial in the journal Functional Ecology, Prof Seddon argues that efforts would be better directed at species where conservation benefits are clearer.

    "The ecological niches in which mammoths - or moa for instance - once lived, no longer exist in any meaningful way," he said.

    "If we were to bring such species back, apart from just as scientific curios, these animals would likely be inherently maladapted to our modern eco-systems."

    Instead, using cloning techniques to re-establish "proxies" of species that have recently become extinct should be the focus, along with trying to ensure the survival of endangered species.

    "Extinction of any species marks a significant threshold that, once crossed, cannot be fully reversed, despite the apparent promise of powerful new technologies," Prof Seddon said.

    He suggested de-extinction projects would inevitably be pursued.

    "The reality of the idea is too sexy to ignore, and it could be driven by aesthetic, commercial, scientific, or some other hitherto unanticipated imperatives and motivations."


    NZN




    © 2017 NZN, NZCity


     Other Technology News
     22 Aug: No rush to 5G mobile in NZ
     21 Aug: Vodafone back in black as sales tick up
     18 Aug: $35m for advanced genomics research
     18 Aug: Owha the leopard seal loving NZ waters
     17 Aug: Extinct penguin never existed
     16 Aug: Extinct Northland shag a distinct species
     11 Aug: India's blurry battle between digital freedom and security
     Top Stories

    RUGBY RUGBY
    Black Ferns boost bench for US semi-final More...


    BUSINESS BUSINESS
    Comvita gains as earnings beat guidance More...



     Today's News

    Entertainment:
    Robin Thicke and Paula Patton have reached a custody agreement 13:16

    Politics:
    Donald Trump looked directly at the eclipse, ignoring his own government's safety advice 13:07

    Law and Order:
    Inquest begins into Kiwi rocker's death 13:07

    Business:
    Comvita gains as earnings beat guidance 12:57

    Entertainment:
    Lady Antebellum’s Hillary Scott is pregnant with twins 12:46

    Business:
    Ingham's posts 2.5pc gain in FY earnings 12:27

    Entertainment:
    Kendra Wilkinson Baskett won't "sugarcoat" her parenting 12:16

    Environment:
    Rare birds released at Mackenzie Basin 11:57

    Entertainment:
    Kate Beckinsale is “scared” to let her daughter leave home 11:46

    Entertainment:
    Justin Bieber has been “getting better” since cancelling the remainder of his world tour 11:16


     News Search






    Power Search


    © 2017 New Zealand City Ltd