News | Health & Safety
12 Dec 2017 4:23
NZCity News
NZCity CalculatorReturn to NZCity

  • Start Page
  • Personalise
  • Days of Xmas
  • Sport
  • Weather
  • Finance
  • Shopping
  • Jobs
  • Horoscopes
  • Lotto Results
  • Photo Gallery
  • Site Gallery
  • TVNow
  • Dating
  • SearchNZ
  • NZSearch
  • Crime.co.nz
  • RugbyLeague
  • Make Home
  • About NZCity
  • Contact NZCity
  • Your Privacy
  • Advertising
  • Login
  • Join for Free

  •   Home > News > Health & Safety

    Study highlights conflict NZ nurses face

    A Victoria University study has looked at the challenges that nurses face in meeting patient needs while addressing healthcare priorities.


    New Zealand's healthcare environments create a conflict between how nurses want to practise and how they are able to, a Victoria University study has found.

    Researcher Dr Helen Rook says the tension causes anxiety, exhaustion, cynicism and burnout.

    To manage that, nurses unconsciously prioritise functional tasks over all other care.

    "Nurses go into the profession with an assumption that they will be caring for people who are sick, taking a moment to talk with them and build caring relationships," she said.

    "But the culture doesn't allow for this - district health board managerial imperatives of getting patients out of hospital quickly, combined with financial constraints, mean that it just isn't possible."

    Dr Rook looked at the daily challenges nurses faced in meeting the needs of patients while addressing healthcare priorities and attending to their own obligations.

    She spent more than 300 hours in DHB medical wards observing and talking to nurses.

    She concluded that, while nurses were expected to be caring and compassionate, in practice they have to "get the paperwork done".

    "I watched nurses walking past patients who were calling out for help, and call bells that were unanswered, not because nurses were uncaring but because they had so many other things to do, to comply with," she said.

    Dr Rook said management models dominated healthcare delivery and it was imperative that nurses were supported so they could practise effectively.

    "In turn, organisations needed to understand the values of professional nursing practice and consider how healthcare environments can enable nurses to live their values."


    NZN




    © 2017 NZN, NZCity


     Other Health & Safety News
     11 Dec: Vital buys rehab hospital in Queensland
     09 Dec: Feijoa research could treat fungus
     09 Dec: Study shows best breast cancer treatment
     05 Dec: Govt appoints health advisory group
     03 Dec: Whitelock has big shave at charity event
     02 Dec: Cricketers go to bat for health service
     02 Dec: Concerns over Taser use on mentally ill
     Top Stories

    RUGBY RUGBY
    Ieremia takes over as Auckland rugby coach More...


    BUSINESS BUSINESS
    Shares rise, led by Metro Glass, Heartland More...



     Today's News

    International:
    Donald Trump's Jerusalem move ends US role in peace process, Palestinian leader Hanan Ashrawi says 22:17

    Sailing:
    NZ crews make strong start to Sail Sydney 21:57

    Entertainment:
    Jessica Chastain thinks Hollywood needs to impose "quotas" to address the gender imbalance 21:46

    Education:
    Bullied boy's emotional video rallies huge support from celebrities 21:17

    Cricket:
    Taylor reaches fairytale milestone 21:17

    Entertainment:
    Danielle Lloyd thinks her baby son is "advanced" 21:16

    Rugby League:
    NRL accuse Manly of cap breaches 20:57

    Entertainment:
    Jessica Chastain was told to “calm down” after she took a stand against disgraced producer Harvey Weinstein 20:46

    Cricket:
    Windies lose two wickets in 444 chase 20:27

    Entertainment:
    Ric Flair doesn’t remember what happened to him during his health scare earlier this year 20:16


     News Search






    Power Search


    © 2017 New Zealand City Ltd