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22 Apr 2018 3:41
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  •   Home > News > Education

    University's 600yo scroll going online

    An English scroll which dates back to the Middle Ages will be made into a digital edition for the public thanks to the University of Canterbury.


    The translation of a scroll which dates back to the Middle Ages will be unveiled to the world in a digital form with the help of academics at the University of Canterbury.

    The 600-year-old Canterbury Roll, which is a genealogical scroll, tells the history of England from its mythical origins to the late Middle Ages.

    Canterbury University took possession of the scroll in 1918 and it is the only genealogical roll in the southern hemisphere.

    To mark the centenary of possessing the scroll, the university will release a new digital edition and translation of it, making it more accessible to the online public.

    A British research team is also part of the project and will carry out in-depth testing to look for hidden writing in the scroll.

    The five-metre scroll is "visually striking" and dates back to the War of the Roses, which is what the hit TV show Game of Thrones is based on, says UC medieval historian senior lecturer Dr Chris Jones.

    "It is not the only manuscript roll from this period to exist in the world, but, uniquely, it features contributions from both the key players in the Wars of the Roses - it was originally drawn up by the Lancastrian side in the conflict but it fell into Yorkist hands and they re-wrote part of it," he said.

    The scroll was previously owned by famous Cantabrian, Nurse Maude.

    "We are unclear how her family acquired it, although the family believed in 1918 that they had owned it since the Middle Ages," Dr Jones said.

    It's believed that Canterbury College professors bought the scroll as part of an effort to help foster a sense of British identity in the closing days of World War I.


    NZN




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