News | International
12 Dec 2019 19:58
NZCity News
NZCity CalculatorReturn to NZCity

  • Start Page
  • Personalise
  • Days of Xmas
  • Sport
  • Weather
  • Finance
  • Shopping
  • Jobs
  • Horoscopes
  • Lotto Results
  • Photo Gallery
  • Site Gallery
  • TVNow
  • Dating
  • SearchNZ
  • NZSearch
  • Crime.co.nz
  • RugbyLeague
  • Make Home
  • About NZCity
  • Contact NZCity
  • Your Privacy
  • Advertising
  • Login
  • Join for Free

  •   Home > News > International

    Korean river runs red from blood of pigs culled amid African swine fever outbreak

    As South Korea battles an outbreak of African swine fever, the destruction of some 47,000 pigs sees the Imjin River, which runs through the demilitarised zone, turning blood red.


    As South Korea battles an outbreak of African swine fever (ASF), the destruction of some 47,000 pigs has led to the Imjin River, which runs through the demilitarised zone, turning blood red.

    The strange colour is the result of the river being polluted with the blood of many of the slaughtered pigs. Heavy rains caused their blood to flow from a border burial site into a tributary of the Imjin.

    South Korean authorities culled the pigs in an attempt to halt the spread of the disease, which is highly contagious and incurable, with a near zero survival rate for infected pigs.

    It is not dangerous to humans though.

    Still, the contamination of South Korea's seventh-largest river has prompted concerns it could aid the spread of ASF to other at-risk animals.

    However, authorities dismissed such fears, saying the culled pigs were disinfected before being slaughtered.

    They also said emergency steps had been taken to prevent further pollution of the river, which was the site of a battle during the Korean War.

    The pig-culling operation was carried out over the weekend. The carcasses were said to have been left inside multiple trucks at a burial site near the inter-Korean border.

    A delay in the production of plastic containers used in the burial meant it could not be carried out immediately.

    North Korean link

    ASF was only discovered in South Korea recently, and there was speculation it arrived via pigs crossing the heavily guarded demilitarised zone (DMZ) that separates the north and south even though South Korean officers at the zone had been authorised to and have shot dead wild boars trying to cross.

    Despite the precautions, South Korea reported its first ASF case on September 17, with the total now at 13. There are about 6,700 pig farms in South Korea.

    Much of Asia has been affected by the outbreak, including China, Vietnam and the Philippines.

    In China, where pork is a staple of the diet, 1.2 million pigs have reportedly been culled. More than 5 million are believed to have been culled in Vietnam.

    Mongolia, the Philippines and Laos have also culled tens of thousands of pigs.

    The virus is yet to reach Australian shores but it is having an effect on the industry here, with "over-the-hook" pork prices rising from roughly $2.50 per kilogram last year to $3.50 per kilogram this year.


    ABC




    © 2019 ABC Australian Broadcasting Corporation. All rights reserved


     Other International News
     12 Dec: UK election: Here are all the weird traditions, exit polls and voting blocs that will determine the winner
     12 Dec: New Zealand White Island volcano burns victims need '120 square metres of skin' for grafts
     12 Dec: Here's when we'll know UK election results and what happens with Brexit if Boris Johnson wins
     12 Dec: Australia needs to triple renewable energy plants by 2040 to replace coal power plants set to close
     12 Dec: Aung San Suu Kyi denies genocide, says Rohingya Muslims caught up in armed internal conflict
     12 Dec: New Zealand's Whakaari/White Island victims are all covered by state compensation. Here's why
     12 Dec: UK election is the continuation — not the end — of this toxic chapter of British politics and history
     Top Stories

    RUGBY RUGBY
    Sir Graham Henry believes Scott Robertson will one day coach the All Blacks More...


    BUSINESS BUSINESS
    UK election: Here are all the weird traditions, exit polls and voting blocs that will determine the winner More...



     Today's News

    Business:
    UK election: Here are all the weird traditions, exit polls and voting blocs that will determine the winner 19:57

    Entertainment:
    John Boyega and the rest of the cast of 'Star Wars' had a "big cry" on the last day of shooting on 'The Rise of Skywalker' 19:40

    Entertainment:
    Chrissy Teigen hates John Legend's "scheduling" 19:10

    Politics:
    Not everyone's in favour of a brand new stadium for Christchurch 18:57

    Entertainment:
    Jennifer Lopez has praised an "amazing" fan who asked an airline pilot to make an announcement urging every passenger to watch her movie 'Hustlers' on a flight 18:40

    Business:
    Cathay Pacific is taking over Air New Zealand's Hong-Kong-Auckland return service for the next three months 18:37

    Health & Safety:
    New Zealand White Island volcano burns victims need '120 square metres of skin' for grafts 18:17

    Entertainment:
    Chantelle Houghton is still in touch with her ex-husband Preston 18:10

    International:
    Here's when we'll know UK election results and what happens with Brexit if Boris Johnson wins 18:07

    Cricket:
    The International team has taken a commanding lead after the first days play of the Presidents Cup 18:07


     News Search






    Power Search


    © 2019 New Zealand City Ltd