News | Law and Order
28 Oct 2020 15:47
NZCity News
NZCity CalculatorReturn to NZCity

  • Start Page
  • Personalise
  • Sport
  • Weather
  • Finance
  • Shopping
  • Jobs
  • Horoscopes
  • Lotto Results
  • Photo Gallery
  • Site Gallery
  • TVNow
  • Dating
  • SearchNZ
  • NZSearch
  • Crime.co.nz
  • RugbyLeague
  • Make Home
  • About NZCity
  • Contact NZCity
  • Your Privacy
  • Advertising
  • Login
  • Join for Free

  •   Home > News > Law and Order

    US-linked security sources discussed kidnapping or poisoning Julian Assange, London court told

    Security contacts linked to the US discussed plans to kidnap or even poison Julian Assange as part of an elaborate spying operation during the latter part of his seven-year stay at the Ecuadorian Embassy, a London court hears.


    Security contacts linked to the US discussed plans to kidnap or even poison Julian Assange as part of an elaborate spying operation during the latter part of his seven-year stay at the Ecuadorian Embassy, a London court has heard.

    In written statements at Assange's extradition hearing, two anonymous witnesses who worked for a Spanish firm with a security contract at the embassy said the WikiLeaks founder faced an intensifying bugging operation from 2017 onwards, after Donald Trump became US President.

    Judge Vanessa Baraitser had previously granted the two witnesses anonymity amid fears for their safety.

    Lawyers acting on behalf of the US Government did not contest the submission of the anonymous statements but said they were largely irrelevant to the matter under consideration in London's Old Bailey court.

    The two witnesses alleged that David Morales, the director of Spanish security firm Undercover Global, switched to "the dark side" and had instructed the installation of cameras with sophisticated audio capabilities to secretly record Assange's meetings at the embassy, particularly those with his lawyers.

    Assange lived in the embassy for seven years from 2012 after seeking refuge there while fearing his potential extradition to the US.

    He was evicted in April 2019 and has been in a London prison since.

    The anonymous witnesses both claimed that Morales said the surveillance was initiated at the behest of "our American friends" and that he had been well rewarded.

    One of the witnesses said Morales travelled to Las Vegas around July 2016 to showcase the security firm and subsequently obtained a "flashy contract" with the Las Vegas Sands, which was owned by Sheldon Adelson, a wealthy associate of Mr Trump's.

    "After returning from one of his trips to the United States, David Morales gathered all the workers in the office in Jerez and told us that 'We have moved up and from now on we will be playing in the big league,'" the witness said.

    'Kidnap the asylee'

    The other anonymous witness, who was employed as an IT expert from 2015, alleged that while in the southern Spanish city of Jerez in, where UC Global had its headquarters, Morales had said in December 2017 that "the Americans were desperate".

    The witness said a suggestion was made that "more extreme measures should be employed against the 'guest' to put an end to the situation of Assange's permanence in the embassy."

    Specifically, the witness said the idea was raised for the door to the embassy to be left open, "which would allow the argument that this had been an accidental mistake, which would allow persons to enter from outside the embassy and kidnap the asylee".

    There was, the witness claimed, even a suggestion that Assange could be poisoned.

    "All of these suggestions Morales said were under consideration during his dealing with his contacts in the United States," the witness said.

    The witness also alleged that Morales had asked him soon after to install a microphone in an extinguisher in an embassy meeting room, as well as in a toilet where Assange had been holding meetings due to his concerns that he was the target of espionage.

    "I used a nearby socket to conceal a microphone in a cable in the toilet in the back of the embassy," the witness said.

    "This was never removed, and may still be there."

    US prosecutors have indicted the 49-year-old Assange on 17 espionage charges and one charge of computer misuse over WikiLeaks' publication of secret American military documents a decade ago.

    The charges carry a maximum sentence of 175 years in prison.

    Assange's defence team say he is entitled to First Amendment protections for the publication of leaked documents that exposed US military wrongdoing in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    They have also said he is suffering from wide-ranging mental health issues, including suicidal tendencies, that could be exacerbated if he ends up in inhospitable prison conditions in the US.

    Assange's extradition hearing, which was delayed by the coronavirus pandemic, is due to end this week.

    ABC/AP


    ABC




    © 2020 ABC Australian Broadcasting Corporation. All rights reserved


     Other Law and Order News
     28 Oct: A penalty for overcharging customers at one of Auckland's biggest supermarkets, Pak'nSave Mangere
     28 Oct: A former Victim Support boss jailed for 14 years for historic sex offences, is appealing his conviction and sentence in the Christchurch High Court today
     28 Oct: One of two people charged by the Serious Fraud Office after an investigation into the New Zealand First Foundation has pleaded not guilty
     28 Oct: Police are investigating a mysterious death in Christchurch's Heathcote Valley
     28 Oct: The Barbarians who broke coronavirus protocols ahead of their scheduled rugby match with England, will not face a police investigation
     28 Oct: Eight pohutukawa trees lining a street in the Auckland suburb of Karaka have been felled in a weekend chainsaw attack
     28 Oct: Experts are unable to tell if efforts to reduce the number of cot deaths are having any impact
     Top Stories

    RUGBY RUGBY
    The Barbarians who broke coronavirus protocols ahead of their scheduled rugby match with England, will not face a police investigation More...


    BUSINESS BUSINESS
    A penalty for overcharging customers at one of Auckland's biggest supermarkets, Pak'nSave Mangere More...



     Today's News

    Cricket:
    Fraser Sheat has ripped through the Wellington batting line-up to give Canterbury the advantage on day one of the second round of the Plunket Shield 15:27

    Entertainment:
    Lily James "threw a tantrum" on a movie set over the Spice Girls 15:25

    Netball:
    The Silver Ferns are looking to improve their work off the ball in tonight's first netball test against England in Hamilton 14:57

    Entertainment:
    Anthony Mackie "cared deeply" about Chadwick Boseman 14:55

    Politics:
    Consumer prices surge 1.6 per cent over September quarter as free childcare policy ends 14:37

    Entertainment:
    Jennifer Lopez found it hard to be treated as an equal in the film industry 14:25

    Netball:
    Netball New Zealand's setting the standard for Covid-19 recovery, with the first post-pandemic international test match tonight 14:07

    Cricket:
    Wickets galore in the opening session of the second round of cricket's Plunket Shield 14:07

    Entertainment:
    Khloe Kardashian is “hopeful about [her] future” with Tristan Thompson 13:55

    Business:
    A penalty for overcharging customers at one of Auckland's biggest supermarkets, Pak'nSave Mangere 13:47


     News Search






    Power Search


    © 2020 New Zealand City Ltd